In Home Caregivers is an independent home care agency servicing Cook, Lake and DuPage Counties.

Our team of home care specialists offer a variety of services:

  • Premium personal certified nursing assistants and trained caregivers
  • Concierge services for seniors and physically challenged individuals who need assistance
  • Home retrofitting services to age in place
Home Care Giver

CAREGIVERS

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CAREGIVERS

  • ♥ certified nursing assistants
  • ♥ caregivers
  • ♥ companion care

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Home Service bill payment

HOME SERVICES

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HOME SERVICES

  • ♥ meal preparation
  • ♥ light housekeeping
  • ♥ bill pay assistance

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Home Retofit Service

HOME RETROFIT

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HOME RETROFIT

  • ♥ bathroom/kitchen modifications
  • ♥ safety bars/handrails
  • ♥ mobility lifts/ramps

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In Home Assesment

Our free “in home” assessments determine a client’s specific needs for a custom care plan

PPE and Safety Checks

We provide PPE and safety health checks for all employees

Communication to Family Members

Our team provides consistent communication to family members about their loved ones

From Our Facebook Page

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When everything seems to be against you, remember that the airplane takes off against the wind, not with it. ~Henry Ford~
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#motivation #mondaymotivation #inspirationalquotes #inspire
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When everything seems to be against you, remember that the airplane takes off against the wind, not with it. ~Henry Ford~
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#motivation #mondaymotivation #inspirationalquotes #inspire

With The New Day Comes New Strength And New Thoughts.
- Eleanor Roosevelt

#motivationalmonday #motivational #motivated
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With The New Day Comes New Strength And New Thoughts.
- Eleanor Roosevelt

#motivationalmonday  #motivational #motivated

Helping a Loved One Manage Parkinson’s Disease

Today, an estimated 10 million people worldwide are living with this neurodegenerative disorder, and more than three million people die of the disease each year.

What is Parkinson’s disease?
Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a disorder of the brain that affects the transmission of messages to the muscles. When a person has PD, there is damage to the part of the brain that produces dopamine, an important chemical that allows the muscles to operate properly. The causes of PD are not entirely understood. Scientists continue to learn about genetic and environmental factors.

What are the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease?
Tremor. The most common symptom is trembling or involuntary movement of hands, arms, legs or face; the person may appear to be “rolling” something between their fingers.
Rigidity. The muscles are tense and contracted. It’s hard to move the arms and legs, and this effect may be painful. Handwriting may become cramped and harder to read.
Slowness of body movement. The person might experience a slow, shuffling gait, sometimes alternating between slow steps and more rapid ones.
Balance problems. Postural instability makes it hard to sit up or stand up straight, and raises the risk of falling.
Difficulty chewing and swallowing. The muscles that help us eat may be affected, which can lead to drooling, choking and pneumonia.
Speech difficulties. Speech may be slow and expressionless. Facial mobility also is affected, so the person may seem to be expressionless.
Non-motor symptoms. Some symptoms of PD do not involve movement. A person may experience depression and other emotional changes, sleep disruptions, thinking or memory problems, and other personality changes.

How is Parkinson’s disease diagnosed?
They’re currently no definitive tests to confirm the diagnosis, which is instead based on observation of the person’s symptoms and on their medical history. The doctor may order laboratory tests and brain scans, but those are to rule out other diseases that might be causing the symptoms — neither helps in diagnosing PD.
It might take a while for the doctor to arrive at a definitive diagnosis. Each case of PD is a bit different. Symptoms differ and can vary over time — a patient might have some better days, some worse, and days when one symptom is more noticeable than others. It is likewise difficult to predict the course of the disease in an individual patient. According to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), although some people with PD experience only minor motor disruptions, others eventually need to use a wheelchair and become bedridden.
Further complicating diagnosis, other neurological disorders also cause similar movement problems. These are referred to as parkinsonisms, and include certain brain diseases, stroke, abnormal fluid on the brain, head injuries, or the effects of drugs and alcohol.
Medication and other treatments for PD will not help if a patient has one of these other conditions — and vice versa. So, a correct diagnosis is very important, even if the answer isn’t readily clear.

Can Parkinson’s disease be cured or treated?
As of yet, there is no cure for PD. But treatments can reduce symptoms significantly.
Treatment is individualized to each patient, and might include:
The role of family and friends
Your role might include:
Family caregivers face challenges
As they’re helping their loved one manage PD, family often lose sight of their own health and well-being. They might be juggling work duties and other family responsibilities with their loved one’s care. And often they are dealing with emotional pain of their own. As their loved one’s condition changes, spouses and children evolve into the caregiver role. PD also changes the way patients communicate, so family must learn new ways to connect.

Fortunately, our healthcare system is recognizing the important role of family caregivers. If you are a family caregiver, learn about support resources that can help. Talk to other family members and friends about your loved one’s needs and how they can help. You can’t do it alone!

Home care is a great support resource
Call one of the specialists at In Home Caregivers today ☎️ (847) 219-1718 to find out more about the ways that we can help your family.
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.
.
#inhomecare #inhomecarematters #adults #seniorcare
#parkinson
... See MoreSee Less

Helping a Loved One Manage Parkinson’s Disease

Today, an estimated 10 million people worldwide are living with this neurodegenerative disorder, and more than three million people die of the disease each year.

What is Parkinson’s disease?
Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a disorder of the brain that affects the transmission of messages to the muscles. When a person has PD, there is damage to the part of the brain that produces dopamine, an important chemical that allows the muscles to operate properly. The causes of PD are not entirely understood. Scientists continue to learn about genetic and environmental factors.

What are the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease?
Tremor. The most common symptom is trembling or involuntary movement of hands, arms, legs or face; the person may appear to be “rolling” something between their fingers.
Rigidity. The muscles are tense and contracted. It’s hard to move the arms and legs, and this effect may be painful. Handwriting may become cramped and harder to read.
Slowness of body movement. The person might experience a slow, shuffling gait, sometimes alternating between slow steps and more rapid ones.
Balance problems. Postural instability makes it hard to sit up or stand up straight, and raises the risk of falling.
Difficulty chewing and swallowing. The muscles that help us eat may be affected, which can lead to drooling, choking and pneumonia.
Speech difficulties. Speech may be slow and expressionless. Facial mobility also is affected, so the person may seem to be expressionless.
Non-motor symptoms. Some symptoms of PD do not involve movement. A person may experience depression and other emotional changes, sleep disruptions, thinking or memory problems, and other personality changes.

How is Parkinson’s disease diagnosed?
They’re currently no definitive tests to confirm the diagnosis, which is instead based on observation of the person’s symptoms and on their medical history. The doctor may order laboratory tests and brain scans, but those are to rule out other diseases that might be causing the symptoms — neither helps in diagnosing PD.
It might take a while for the doctor to arrive at a definitive diagnosis. Each case of PD is a bit different. Symptoms differ and can vary over time — a patient might have some better days, some worse, and days when one symptom is more noticeable than others. It is likewise difficult to predict the course of the disease in an individual patient. According to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), although some people with PD experience only minor motor disruptions, others eventually need to use a wheelchair and become bedridden.
Further complicating diagnosis, other neurological disorders also cause similar movement problems. These are referred to as parkinsonisms, and include certain brain diseases, stroke, abnormal fluid on the brain, head injuries, or the effects of drugs and alcohol.
Medication and other treatments for PD will not help if a patient has one of these other conditions — and vice versa. So, a correct diagnosis is very important, even if the answer isn’t readily clear.

Can Parkinson’s disease be cured or treated?
As of yet, there is no cure for PD. But treatments can reduce symptoms significantly.
Treatment is individualized to each patient, and might include:
The role of family and friends
Your role might include:
Family caregivers face challenges
As they’re helping their loved one manage PD, family often lose sight of their own health and well-being. They might be juggling work duties and other family responsibilities with their loved one’s care. And often they are dealing with emotional pain of their own. As their loved one’s condition changes, spouses and children evolve into the caregiver role. PD also changes the way patients communicate, so family must learn new ways to connect.

Fortunately, our healthcare system is recognizing the important role of family caregivers. If you are a family caregiver, learn about support resources that can help. Talk to other family members and friends about your loved one’s needs and how they can help. You can’t do it alone!

Home care is a great support resource
Call one of the specialists at In Home Caregivers today ☎️ (847) 219-1718 to find out more about the ways that we can help your family.
.
.
.
#inhomecare #inhomecarematters #adults #seniorcare 
#parkinson

5 Ways to Prevent Bedsores in Seniors

Bedsores are a serious concern for older adults who are unable to move easily on their own. Today, many caregivers also refer to this condition as pressure sores, since they can occur when seniors spend too much time in one position in chairs and on other types of furniture. Seniors can also develop bedsores from transfers that accidentally rub their fragile skin. Once their skin gets damaged from being exposed to constant pressure, infections and painful ulcers can set in. Sore prevention is a priority, and you can protect your aging loved one’s delicate skin by making a few changes in your daily routine.

1. Follow a Strict Repositioning Schedule
Seniors who become bedridden often have health conditions that make it difficult for them to move on their own. In some cases, they may not be able to express if something hurts or begins to irritate their skin. Seniors should be repositioned at least every two hours. Depending on your loved one’s abilities, this could mean moving from a sitting to a standing position. Some seniors may only be able to move from lying on one side of their bodies to the other. Sticking to this strict schedule may require asking another caregiver to provide you with assistance, especially at night.
A professional caregiver can be a fantastic resource when you need help lifting and repositioning your loved one. If your senior loved one needs professional in-home care in Buffalo Groove In Home Caregivers is here to help. We are a trusted provider of respite and 24-hour care, and we also offer specialized Alzheimer’s, dementia, Parkinson’s, and stroke care for seniors.

2. Add Extra Cushioning to At-Risk Areas
You’ll find special mattress and chair pads designed to relieve pressure on the spots of your loved one’s body where bedsores are more likely to appear. Adding extra cushioning can relieve the pressure on your loved one’s skin, but you’ll want to remember it only serves as an extra layer of protection. Repositioning and using extreme caution during transfers still remain your primary priorities.

3. Take Care of Your Loved One’s Skin
Healthy skin is less likely to tear or develop an ulcer from pressure. Make sure to bathe your loved one regularly, and consider applying lotion if his or her skin is prone to dryness. If your loved one does develop a red spot or cut, treat it appropriately to prevent it from developing an infection.

4. Promote Healing with Healthy Meals
Skin is nourished from the inside of the body. Eating nutritious meals helps your loved one have the nutrients needed to stay healthier and stronger. Vitamins A, D, and C are especially good for aging skin. If your loved one has difficulty with eating, consider making healthy shakes and soups that might be easier to eat.
Many seniors prefer aging in place over moving to assisted living facilities. If your senior loved one needs assistance to remain safe and comfortable while living at home, reach out to In Home Caregivers, a leading home care service agency. Our dedicated in-home caregivers can assist with meal prep, bathing and grooming, exercise, medication reminders, and many other important tasks.

5. Perform Daily Skin Checks
Even with the best of care, your loved one may still develop pressure spots. Check his or her skin for signs of redness, inflammation, or cuts each day. Remember to pay attention to areas you might not always think to check, such as behind the ears and knees. If you do notice redness, make sure to keep pressure off that area. Your loved one may also need to have sores checked by a physician to make sure he or she doesn’t develop complications. Call one of the specialists at In Home Caregivers today ☎️ (847) 219-1718 to find out more about the ways that we can help your family.
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.
.
#inhomecare #inhomecarematters #adults #seniorcare
... See MoreSee Less

5 Ways to Prevent Bedsores in Seniors

Bedsores are a serious concern for older adults who are unable to move easily on their own. Today, many caregivers also refer to this condition as pressure sores, since they can occur when seniors spend too much time in one position in chairs and on other types of furniture. Seniors can also develop bedsores from transfers that accidentally rub their fragile skin. Once their skin gets damaged from being exposed to constant pressure, infections and painful ulcers can set in. Sore prevention is a priority, and you can protect your aging loved one’s delicate skin by making a few changes in your daily routine.

1. Follow a Strict Repositioning Schedule
Seniors who become bedridden often have health conditions that make it difficult for them to move on their own. In some cases, they may not be able to express if something hurts or begins to irritate their skin. Seniors should be repositioned at least every two hours. Depending on your loved one’s abilities, this could mean moving from a sitting to a standing position. Some seniors may only be able to move from lying on one side of their bodies to the other. Sticking to this strict schedule may require asking another caregiver to provide you with assistance, especially at night.
A professional caregiver can be a fantastic resource when you need help lifting and repositioning your loved one. If your senior loved one needs professional in-home care in Buffalo Groove In Home Caregivers is here to help. We are a trusted provider of respite and 24-hour care, and we also offer specialized Alzheimer’s, dementia, Parkinson’s, and stroke care for seniors.

2. Add Extra Cushioning to At-Risk Areas
You’ll find special mattress and chair pads designed to relieve pressure on the spots of your loved one’s body where bedsores are more likely to appear. Adding extra cushioning can relieve the pressure on your loved one’s skin, but you’ll want to remember it only serves as an extra layer of protection. Repositioning and using extreme caution during transfers still remain your primary priorities.

3. Take Care of Your Loved One’s Skin
Healthy skin is less likely to tear or develop an ulcer from pressure. Make sure to bathe your loved one regularly, and consider applying lotion if his or her skin is prone to dryness. If your loved one does develop a red spot or cut, treat it appropriately to prevent it from developing an infection.

4. Promote Healing with Healthy Meals
Skin is nourished from the inside of the body. Eating nutritious meals helps your loved one have the nutrients needed to stay healthier and stronger. Vitamins A, D, and C are especially good for aging skin. If your loved one has difficulty with eating, consider making healthy shakes and soups that might be easier to eat.
Many seniors prefer aging in place over moving to assisted living facilities. If your senior loved one needs assistance to remain safe and comfortable while living at home, reach out to In Home Caregivers, a leading home care service agency. Our dedicated in-home caregivers can assist with meal prep, bathing and grooming, exercise, medication reminders, and many other important tasks.

5. Perform Daily Skin Checks
Even with the best of care, your loved one may still develop pressure spots. Check his or her skin for signs of redness, inflammation, or cuts each day. Remember to pay attention to areas you might not always think to check, such as behind the ears and knees. If you do notice redness, make sure to keep pressure off that area. Your loved one may also need to have sores checked by a physician to make sure he or she doesn’t develop complications. Call one of the specialists at In Home Caregivers today ☎️ (847) 219-1718 to find out more about the ways that we can help your family.
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.
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#inhomecare #inhomecarematters #adults #seniorcare
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